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Fiction/Music/Film

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  • Henry Purcell’s last major work, composed in 1695, was music for play entitled Bonduca, or the British Heroine (Z. 574). Selections include “To Arms”, “Britons, Strike Home”, and “O lead me to some peaceful gloom”. Boudica has also been the primary subject of songs by Irish singer/songwriter Enya, Dutch soprano Petra Berger, Scottish singer/songwriter Steve McDonald, English metal band Bal-Sagoth, Faith and the Muse, and Dreams in the Witching House.
  • Boudica has been the subject of two feature films, the 1927 film Boadicea, where she was portrayed by Phyllis Neilson-Terry, and 2003’s Boudica (Warrior Queen in the US), a UK TV film written by Andrew Davies and starring Alex Kingston as Boudica. She has also been the subject of a 1978 British TV series, Warrior Queen, starring Siân Phillips as Boudica. Jennifer Ward-Lealand portrayed Boudica in an episode of Xena: Warrior Princess titled “The Deliverer” in 1997.
  • The Viking Queen is a 1967 Hammer Films adventure film set in ancient Britain, in which the role of Queen Salina is based upon the historical figure of Boudica.
    In the fictional world of Ghosts of Albion, Queen Bodicea is one of three Ghosts who once were mystical protectors of Albion and assists the current protectors with advice and knowledge.
  • In The Mauritius Command by Patrick O’Brian, the 4th novel of the Aubrey-Maturin series, Jack Aubrey is given command of the HMS Boadicea.
  • Boudica’s story is the subject of several novels, including books by Rosemary Sutcliff, Roxanne Gregory, Pauline Gedge, Manda Scott, Alan Gold, Diana L. Paxson, David Wishart, George Shipway, Simon Scarrow, Mary Mackie and J. F. Broxholme (a pseudonym of Duncan Kyle). She plays a central role in the first part of G. A. Henty’s novel Beric the Briton, and The Queen’s Brooch, a children’s novel by Henry Treece, is set during her rebellion. One of the viewpoint characters of Ian Watson’s novel Oracle is an eyewitness to her defeat. She has also appeared in several comic book series, including the Sláine, which featured two runs, titled “Demon Killer” and “Queen of Witches” giving a free interpretation of Boudica’s story. Other comic appearances include Witchblade and From Hell. The DC Comics character Boodikka, a member of the Green Lantern Corps, was named after Boudica. Additionally, in the alternate history novel Ruled Britannia by Harry Turtledove, Boudicca is the subject of a play written by William Shakespeare to incite the people of Britain to revolt against Spanish conquerors.
  • Boudicca is a character in the animated series Gargoyles.
  • The 2012 Big Finish Productions Doctor Who audio play The Wrath of the Iceni starring Tom Baker takes place during Boudica’s uprising against the Romans. Boudica is portrayed by British actress Ella Kenion.
  • In Civilization IV: Beyond the Sword and Civilization V: Gods & Kings, Boudicca is leader of the Celtic tribe.
  • Enya recorded a song entitled “Boadicea” for her 1987 LP Enya.
  • The lyrics of the song “The Good Old Days”, written by Pete Doherty and Carl Barat for British rock band The Libertines, refer to her under the alternate spelling (“If Queen Boadicea is long dead and gone, Still then the spirit in her children’s children’s children, it lives on”).
  • Martha Howe-Douglas played Boudica in Horrible Histories.
  • She appears as a character in the heavily fictionalized 2013 video game Ryse: Son of Rome.
  • Mason and Róisín Murphy collaborated on the track Boadicea released in 2011, featuring lyrics about the rise and fall of a female warrior.

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Other cultural references

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In 2003 an LTR retrotransposon from the genome of the human blood fluke “Schistosoma mansoni” was named “Boudicca”. The Boudicca retrotransposon, a high-copy retroviral-like element, was the first mobile genetic element of this type to be discovered in S. mansoni.

In July 2008, the British television series Bonekickers, dedicated an hour to Boudica in the episode named “The Eternal Fire”. Various female politicians, including former Prime Minister of New Zealand Helen Clark have been called Boadicea.

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Source(s)

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For the references, further reading and the external links get to the source for this article at:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boudica

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Boadicea: An Ode

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By William Cowper (1731–1800)

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WHEN the British warrior queen,
Bleeding from the Roman rods,
Sought, with an indignant mien,
Counsel of her country’s gods,

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Sage beneath a spreading oak
Sat the Druid, hoary chief;
Every burning word he spoke
Full of rage, and full of grief.

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‘Princess! if our aged eyes
Weep upon thy matchless wrongs,
’Tis because resentment ties
All the terrors of our tongues.

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‘Rome shall perish—write that word
In the blood that she has spilt;
Perish, hopeless and abhorred,
Deep in ruin as in guilt.

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‘Rome, for empire far renowned,
Tramples on a thousand states;
Soon her pride shall kiss the ground—
Hark! the Gaul is at her gates!

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‘Other Romans shall arise,
Heedless of a soldier’s name;
Sounds, not arms, shall win the prize—
Harmony the path to fame.

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‘Then the progeny that springs
From the forests of our land,
Armed with thunder, clad with wings,
Shall a wider world command.

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‘Regions Cæsar never knew
Thy posterity shall sway,
Where his eagles never flew,
None invincible as they.’

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Such the bard’s prophetic words,
Pregnant with celestial fire,
Bending, as he swept the chords
Of his sweet but awful lyre.

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She, with all a monarch’s pride,
Felt them in her bosom glow;
Rushed to battle, fought, and died;
Dying, hurled them at the foe.

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‘Ruffians, pitiless as proud,
Heaven awards the vengeance due:
Empire is on us bestowed,
Shame and ruin wait for you.’

 

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