embletonTitle:Hadrian's Wall in the Days of the Romans
Author:Ronald Embleton
Gemre:Historical research
Year:1984
Publ.Frank Graham
Pages:320
ISBN:0859831779
With over 400 illustrations, this book describes what the Roman Wall was like when in use. It tells us about the soldiers who built and garrisoned it and the civilians who lived in the towns and villages scattered along its length. Never before has such a grand attempt been made to show in vivid colourful detail the life of Roman Britain. Every building to be found inside the Roman forts and camps has been carefully reconstructed.
davidwanthonyTitle:The Horse, the Wheel and Language: How Bronze-Age Riders from the Eurasian Steppes Shaped the Modern World
Author:David W. Anthony
Gemre:Historical research
Year:2007
Publ.Princeton University Press
Pages:553
ISBN:9780691058870
Roughly half the world's population speaks languages derived from a shared linguistic source known as Proto-Indo-European. But who were the early speakers of this ancient mother tongue, and how did they manage to spread it around the globe? Until now their identity has remained a tantalizing mystery to linguists, archaeologists, and even Nazis seeking the roots of the Aryan race. "The Horse, the Wheel, and Language" lifts the veil that has long shrouded these original Indo-European speakers, and reveals how their domestication of horses and use of the wheel spread language and transformed civilization.
"The Horse, the Wheel, and Language" solves a puzzle that has vexed scholars for two centuries--the source of the Indo-European languages and English--and recovers a magnificent and influential civilization from the past.
jamescrussellTitle:The Germanization of Early Medieval Christianity: A Sociohistorical Approach to Religious Transformation
Author:James C. Russell
Gemre:Historical research
Year:1996
Publ.Oxford University Press
Pages:258
ISBN:
0195104668
While historians of Christianity have generally acknowledged some degree of Germanic influence in the development of early medieval Christianity, Russell goes further, arguing for a fundamental Germanic reinterpretation of Christianity. This first full-scale treatment of the subject follows a truly interdisciplinary approach, applying to the early medieval period a sociohistorical method similar to that which has already proven fruitful in explicating the history of Early Christianity and Late Antiquity. The encounter of the Germanic peoples with Christianity is studied from within the larger context of the encounter of a predominantly "world-accepting" Indo-European folk-religiosity with predominantly "world-rejecting" religious movements. While the first part of the book develops a general model of religious transformation for such encounters, the second part applies this model to the Germano-Christian scenario. Russell shows how a Christian missionary policy of temporary accommodation inadvertently contributed to a reciprocal Germanization of Christianity.