dwhardingTitle:The Iron Age in Northern Britain - Celts and Romans, natives and invaders
Author:D.W. Harding
Gemre:Historical research
Year:2004
Publ.Routledge
Pages:368
ISBN:978-0415301503
The Iron Age in Northern Britain examines the impact of the Roman expansion northwards, and the native response to the Roman occupation on both sides of the frontiers. It traces the emergence of historically-recorded communities in the post-Roman period and looks at the clash of cultures between Celts and Romans, Picts and Scots. Northern Britain has too often been seen as peripheral to a 'core' located in south-eastern England. Unlike the Iron Age in southern Britain, the story of which can be conveniently terminated with the Roman conquest, the Iron Age in northern Britain has no such horizon to mark its end. The Roman presence in southern and eastern Scotland was militarily intermittent and left untouched large tracts of Atlantic Scotland for which there is a rich legacy of Iron Age settlement, continuing from the mid-first millennium BC to the period of Norse settlement in the late first millennium AD.
derksroymansTitle:Ethnic Constructs in Antiquity - the role of power and tradition
Author:Ton Derks & Nico Roymans (Ed.)
Gemre:Historical research
Year:1994
Publ.Amsterdam University Press
Pages:344
ISBN:978 90 8964 078 9
This bold and original volume explores themes of ethnicity and ethnogenesis in the societies of the ancient world. It starts with a current view held by many in the social and historical sciences, namely that ethnicity is a subjective concept shaped through an interaction with the ethnic other. The thirteen essays collected here analyze historical, epigraphic, and archaeological source material in order to consider the dynamic nature of ethnic formations over time, and range thematically from archaic Greece to early medieval Western Europe.
gerritsenTitle:Local Identities: Landscape and Community in the Late Prehistoric Meuse-Demer-Scheldt region
Author:Fokke Gerritsen
Gemre:Historical research
Year:2003
Publ.Amsterdam University Press
Pages:320
ISBN:978-9053565889
Gerritsen's study investigates how small groups of people—households, or local communities—constitute and represent their social identity by shaping the landscape around them. Examining things like house building and habitation, cremation and burial, and farming and ritual practice, Gerritsen develops a new theoretical and empirical perspective on the practices that create collective senses of identity and belonging. An explicitly diachronic approach reveals processes of
cultural and social change that have previously gone unnoticed, providing a basis for a much more dynamic history of the late prehistoric inhabitants of this region.