socialidentityTitle:Social Identity in Early Medieval Britain
Author:William 0. Frazer, Andrew Tyrrell (Ed.)
Gemre:Historical research
Year:2001
Publ.Continnuum-3PL
Pages:300
ISBN:978-0718500849
Social identity is a concept od increasing importance in the social sciences. Here, the concept is applied to the often atheoretical realm of medieval studies. Each contributor focuses on a particular topic of early medieval identity - ethnicity, national identity, social location, subjectivity / personhood, political organization, kiship, the body, gender, age, proximity/regionality, memory and ideological systems. The result is a pioneering vision of medieval social identity and a challenge to some of the received general wisdoms about this period.
christopherfeeTitle:Gods, Heroes, and Kings: The Battle for Mythic Britain
Author:Christopher R. Fee with David A. Leeming
Gemre:Historical research
Year:2001
Publ.Oxford University Press
Pages:260
ISBN:978-0195174038
In Gods, Heroes, and Kings, medievalist Christopher Fee and veteran myth scholar David Leeming unearth the layers of the British Isles' unique folkloric tradition to discover how this body of seemingly disparate tales developed. The authors find a virtual battlefield of myths in which pagan and Judeo-Christian beliefs fought for dominance, and classical, Anglo-Saxon, Germanic, and Celtic narrative threads became tangled together. The resulting body of legends became a strange but coherent hybrid, so that by the time Chaucer wrote "The Wife of Bath's Tale" in the fourteenth century, a Christian theme of redemption fought for prominence with a tripartite Celtic goddess and the Arthurian legends of Sir Gawain-itself a hybrid mythology.
clarealeesTitle:Tradition and Belief - Religious Writing in Late Anglo-Saxon England
Author:Clare A. Lees
Gemre:Historical religious research
Year:1999
Publ.University of Minnesota Press
Pages:197
ISBN:0-8166-3003-8
In this major study of Angle-Saxon religious tests sermons, homilies, and saints' lives written in Old English -- Clare A. Lees reveals how the invention of preaching transformed the early medieval church, and thus the culture of medieval England in placing Anglo-Saxon prose within a social matrix, her work offers a new way of seeing medieval literature through the lens of cultures.