Helith-cover-en-klein

HELITH

.

an Anglo-Saxon pagan deity

By Swain Wodening and GardenStone

eBook PDF

The names Helia, Heile, Helið and Helith are recorded in several medieval and later publications as names for a pagan deity who was venerated in the southwest of early Anglo-Saxon England. Strange enough, actual scholarly related literature does not mention those records, not even in footnotes. Therefore this contribution, in which the two authors showed both their craving for this kind of clarification and could indulge their passion for historical research in the fields of their interests, closes a ‘historical gap’.

pdf-en.

codex aesinasFirst page of the Germania from
the Codex Aesinas manuscript
.

001.Wodan.047Odin talisman

HRAFNAGALDUR ÓÐINS

.

A contribution in English, German and Dutch

Compiled, edited and (partially) translated by GardenStone

eBook PDF

The Hrafnagaldr Óðins (Odin’s raven-magic), also called Forspjallsljóð (prelude poem) is an Icelandic poem, written in the style of the poems of the Poetic Edda. This contribution offers in three language sections some background information and side by side the Old Norse and translations in the mentioned languages. In addition, a few alternative translations are included.

 

.

pdf-en

.

Nerthus

Mother Earth,

Earthgoddess

.

The text of a lecture hold in 2012 in Lunteren, the Netherlands

eBook PDF

From an ancient document dated ca. 2000 years ago, we know the name Nerthus; and that name appears nowhere else in contemporary sources. With that name a Germanic goddess is meant. That document was written by a Roman scholar, historian and member of the Roman Senate who wrote about Nerthus. His name was Tacitus and he lived from about 58 CE until about 120 CE. Being a Roman he wrote in his mother tongue – in Latin. There is very much speculated about this ancient goddess and this paper dives a little bit in the information and theories around Nerthus. The lecture is based on the book “The Nerthus claim” by the same author and offers a much more extensive research around this topic.

 

.

pdf-en

The German place

Thuste,

the Thuster mountain

and the Germanic

primeval God Tuisto

.

a cooperation between
GardenStone und Karl Oßwald

eBook PDF

According to several source, the German place Thuste and also the near (Thuster Hill (German: Thüster Berg) would have been called after the deity Tuisto or Tuisco. This god is mentioned in the ‘Germania’ by Tacitus from the end of the first Century CE.
The place name is documented for the first time in the year of 1022 in a certificate of the monastery of Saint Michael in the city of Hildesheim, but, so is argued, because the name goes back to the god Tuisto, Tacitus mentions, the place must be much older. This is a ‘nice’ example of circular reasoning but therefore as proof or circumstantial evidence unusable.
Because a dagger made of flint was found in that region, local researchers assume settlement there already in the middle Stone Age.
This contribution gives a rather in detail an answer on the question whether the aforementioned supposition possibly is true or should be expelled to the shpere of wishful thinking.

 

.

pdf-en.

Tuisto-PollyThe primordial deity Tuisto,
by Pollyanna Jones

The ballad

“The Goth’s devotion”

FDahnklein

.

From the novel “Struggle for Rome” by Felix Dahn the ballad “The Goth’s devotion”, offered in the three languages German, English and Dutch.

pdf-en

trennlinie1